Rhonda Shelby

Meteorologist

Rhonda Shelby
Rhonda Shelby
Meteorologist
Rhonda Shelby is a weather anchor for KATU News. She started with KATU in 1993 as Community Relations Director.

Rhonda has received several journalistic awards for her work. While working at KOMO-TV in Seattle, Rhonda received the United Press International Award for "Best Feature Story" and an Emmy Award for a hard-hitting series on Faith Healing.

She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcast journalism from Brigham Young University and a certificate of Broadcast Meteorology from Mississippi State University. She also holds the American Meteorological Society Seal of Approval.

Rhonda is an honorary board member of the Portland/SW Washington Chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). She is also a founding member of the Advisory Council for the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at OHSU.

In her spare time, Rhonda loves fishing and exploring the Northwest, golfing and baking. She is actively involved in community organizations such as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

Recent stories by Rhonda Shelby

Local Light freezing rain on tap for Gorge and Hood River areas? Light freezing rain on tap for Gorge and Hood River areas?
"It's going to be a really relatively small area that sees any freezing rain if any at all today," Shelby said. "It looks like it's just the Gorge and Hood River Valley that will see the possibility of freezing rain" since most other areas will be above the freezing mark when the rain arrives, Shelby said.
Local Rain returns to the Northwest, expect a lot more by Monday Rain returns to the Northwest, expect a lot more by Monday(Video)
After a stretch of nearly 100 days of blue skies, warm temperatures and summer fun, broken just once by a piddling .04 inches of rain many weeks ago, Northwest weather reality has returned along with the rain.
Local Wintry weekend on tap for region as snow level drops Wintry weekend on tap for region as snow level drops
Willamette Valley locations will see mostly rain with a chance of hail at times beginning Friday afternoon and into Saturday as the freezing level heads down to 2,500 feet, Shelby said. Locations above 2,500 feet could see 1 to 4 inches of snow. Then the freezing level drops again on Sunday.
Local Snowy weather system on track for Sunday arrival Snowy weather system on track for Sunday arrival
Rhonda Shelby says forecast models of the storm have stayed consistent and are calling for rain to begin on Saturday as the system moves in and then snow showers to fall Sunday into Monday, which is the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday.
Local Dry December is heading for the record books Dry December is heading for the record books(Video)
Rhonda Shelby said the main cause for this year’s dry December is a high-pressure system sitting over the region that weather systems either go around or run into and fizzle out.
Local Heading to Hood? Bring your chains Heading to Hood? Bring your chains(Video)
Folks have been heading up to Mount Hood for a chance to play in the first mountain snowfall of the season but drivers are being advised to use caution.
Weather Blog Thunderstorm Safety- Tips to Remember Thunderstorm Safety- Tips to Remember
Each spring, Western Oregon and Southwest Washington receives an average of five to ten thunderstorms. Most of them are not considered "severe"; meaning the storm cells do not produce flooding, tornadoes, damaging winds or damaging large hail. However, dozens of lightning strikes occur... disrupting power and life in general. It's a good idea to refresh your memory of what to do if you are ever caught too close to lightning from a thunderstorm. Here are some common questions and answers regarding basic thunderstorm safety:
Weather Blog Weather Service: Snow today Weather Service: Snow today
The newest National Weather Service Winter Weather Advisory for areas 1,000 feet and higher - pertaining to Tuesday afternoon through Wednesday morning - warns of snow in the Coast Range (and Cascade Foothills), Upper Hood River Valley and Willapa Hills.
Local SNOW?? Here's where and how much SNOW?? Here's where and how much(Video)
It got cold in a hurry overnight Tuesday and a big cold front is moving ashore, dropping the snow level down to 500 feet in the Willamette Valley. Mountain regions may get up to three feet of new snow (and they need it). Rhonda Shelby has the details in this video.
Weather Blog The groundhog saw his shadow- but what do the experts say? The groundhog saw his shadow- but what do the experts say?
Punxsutawney Phil, the infamous forecasting groundhog, saw his shadow. For the much of the eastern third of the United States, that means six more weeks of winter. For the Pacific Northwest, it means exactly the opposite this year!


The NOAA Climate Prediction Center's February Outlook shows a "bulls-eye" of warmer than normal weather (A stands for above average)over the Pacific Northwest; while the bulls-eye of cooler weather (B means below average...and generally more winter precipitation) is over the Mid-Atlantic, Southeast and South. The distribution of warm and cooler weather follows a typical El Niño pattern.
Weather Blog 2009: A year of extremes 2009: A year of extremes
The National Weather Service Portland Office recently issued the annual climate report on Portland's weather for 2009. You'll find a full version of it and other yearly summaries from other Oregon cities on its Web site: www.wrh.noaa.gov/pqr/.
Weather Blog Beyond the Forecast: What's your watershed address? Beyond the Forecast: What's your watershed address?
Recently, I came across this article on researching watersheds. Having lived on a river for the past seven years, I understand the importance of stewardship in this area. I am aware that my actions at home can directly affect the quality of the great bodies of water in the Pacific Northwest. Each one of us knows our home address, but what about our watershed address? Earth Gauge provided the following information...
Local Another round of snow Tuesday morning? Another round of snow Tuesday morning?(Video)
Cold air over the area will meet incoming moisture coming off the ocean early Tuesday morning, possibly dropping up to an inch of snow on city streets. Then, temperatures will warm well above freezing a few hours later, melting the snow.