Kids, Sports & Head Injuries

According to CDC reports, high school athletes suffer 2 million injuries and around 8,000 children are treated in emergency rooms each day for sports injuries, many of them for concussions. A concussion is an injury to the brain that can affect a child’s social and academic performance. Approximately one in ten student athletes, who sustain a concussive injury, suffer from deficits in memory, attention, naming and listening comprehension, balance, and visual-perceptual skills.

Laurelin Kirby, M.S., CCC-SLP a Speech-Language Pathologist and Jamie Wirth, local high school athlete, joined us to share their story.   Jamie suffered a series of concussions while playing in basketball games.   Her symptoms got so severe that she had to drop out of school, had to be  home-schooled and could only take one subject at a time.  She was treated by Ms. Kirby for almost two years and now has enough credits to go back to complete her senior year in high school.

There are as many as 100,000 – 300,000 sports-related concussions per year in the U.S. where the athlete loses consciousness. A concussion is an injury to the brain that can affect a child’s social and academic performance. And approximately one in ten student athletes, who sustain a concussive injury, suffer from deficits in memory, attention, naming and listening comprehension, balance, and visual-perceptual skills.

Just 42% of high schools have access to athletic training services specializing in sports medicine. Prior to the point at which a student athlete sustains a concussion, SLPs are poised to educate coaches, athletic trainers, athletes, and their parents about the cognitive-linguistic functions that are affected by concussions, such as verbal reasoning, memory, problem-solving, and comprehension.

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