New Foods

Our favorite registered dietician and author of, "10 Habits That Mess Up A Woman's Diet," Elizabeth Somer, shares the best new foods at the grocery store.

She says the following are foods you shouldn't miss!

1) Sahale Snacks: Nuts are packed with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytonutrients. They lower your risk for heart disease, diabetes, and possibly even help you manage your weight. Of course you need to keep it to about an ounce a day, which might be difficult with these snacks because they are so incredibly tasty!! All are slightly sweet glazed nuts, some with a mix of dried exotic fruits. Take for example, Sing Buri, which is a Thai mix of cashews with pineapple, peanuts, lemongrass, and mild Chinese chili. Or, Dauphine, a mix of walnuts with blueberries, bananas, coconut, ginger, and lavender. These would make great appetizers for your up-coming holiday parties, too. I sprinkle them over my oatmeal for a unique change of taste to a traditional breakfast.

2)Fresh Express has just launched a line of bagged lettuce that is the best lettuce I've ever had, with names like Sweet Tender Greens and Tender Ruby Reds. Really high in phytonutrients that help boost immunity and prevent premature aging.  These hand-picked greens are beautiful, too. So, they make eating salads something to look forward to. Top with roasted beets, red onions, crumbled blue cheese, and an orange vinaigrette, and you have a dish loaded with the B vitamin, folic acid that lowers heart disease and cancer risk, iron that builds red blood cells, and tons of fiber and other vitamins and minerals.

2)Fresh Express has just launched a line of bagged lettuce that is the best lettuce I've ever had, with names like Sweet Tender Greens and Tender Ruby Reds. Really high in phytonutrients that help boost immunity and prevent premature aging.  These hand-picked greens are beautiful, too. So, they make eating salads something to look forward to. Top with roasted beets, red onions, crumbled blue cheese, and an orange vinaigrette, and you have a dish loaded with the B vitamin, folic acid that lowers heart disease and cancer risk, iron that builds red blood cells, and tons of fiber and other vitamins and minerals.

3) Cabot Vermont reduced fat cheddar cheese with DHA tastes just like full-fat cheese and has the heart n' mind-boosting omega-3 fat. DHA lowers your risk for heart disease, cancer, depression, dementia, and possibly arthritis. It is critical for brain and vision development in babies and children.

4) Oroweat Whole Grain 9 Grain Bread with DHA: Whole grains lower the risk for all the diseases that refined grains contribute to, including heart disease, diabetes, stroke, hypertension, and weight gain. This bread tastes great and is the first to add the omega-3 fat DHA. Two slices supply 36 milligrams. Shoot for a total day’s intake of at least 200 milligrams from fatty fish and other foods fortified with a plant-based, contaminant-free DHA. It often will say "lifesDHA" on the label.

5. Ragu, Fresh & Simple pasta sauce: It’s just spaghetti sauce in a bag, but what I like about this product is its ease and no-mess packaging. For all those college students living in the dorms or guys who don’t know how to boil water, let alone clean up a kitchen when they are done, this is the perfect way to get a vegetable into your semi-adult kids, even when they are far from home. All you do is cut the top, toss in the microwave, and pour it over noodles.

6. Jif To Go: While not brand new, these little single-serve peanut butter cups are another way to get your younger kids to eat vegetables and fruit. Tuck into a brown bag lunch with baby carrots or apple slices. Or take on road trips for a handy in-car snack.

7. True Lemon: How many times have you bought lemons only to have them mold before you used them? That’s why I love these little packets of lemon powder. They add the same tart flavor to anything from ice tea to rice dishes, and they wait for you patiently in the cupboard. Lemon also is a great way to make flavors "pop" in almost any dish without adding salt.

For more information about Elizabeth Somer, Visit her website.

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