Weather Blog

Beyond the Forecast: What's your watershed address?

Beyond the Forecast: What's your watershed address?
Rhonda Shelby's daughter learning to fish at an early age on their favorite watershed.

Recently, I came across this article on researching watersheds. Having lived on a river for the past seven years,  I understand the importance of stewardship in this area.  I am aware that my actions at home can directly affect the quality of the great bodies of water in the Pacific Northwest.  Each one of us knows our home address, but what about our watershed address? Earth Gauge provided the following information...

 

Recently, I came across this article on researching watersheds.   Having lived on a river for the past seven years,  I understand the importance of stewardship in this area.  I am aware that my actions at home can directly affect the quality of the great bodies of water in the Pacific Northwest.  Each one of us knows our home address, but what about our watershed address? Earth Gauge provided the following information:

Earth Gauge: Your Watershed Address

Watersheds are areas of land in which all water drains into a common body of water. Because water does not obey political boundaries, watershed maps can cross county, state and even national lines. The size of a watershed can vary, but all bodies of water have one. You can think of watersheds like pieces of a puzzle; each one is part of a larger watershed “picture.” The Columbia River Basin Watershed covers seven states and one Canadian Province.  It is made up of several smaller watersheds, including the Snake River, Yakima River and Spokane River Watersheds. Anytime a raindrop falls in parts of Idaho, Washington, Montana or Oregon, that raindrop could end up in the Columbia River – and eventually the Pacific Ocean!

Interested in knowing your watershed address? 

Surf your watershed: Enter your zip code to find out which watershed you live in: http://cfpub.epa.gov/surf/locate/index.cfm. Explore your watershed: Take a walk or hike in your community and observe which way water travels. Watershed boundaries are usually the highest points of land from which water flows downhill. Where does rain water end up after it hits the ground? Where does your local stream or river lead? Adopt your watershed: Become a volunteer water quality monitor or organize a trash cleanup. Learn more: http://www.epa.gov/adopt/.