Precision Castparts slams study that deemed it the US' top air polluter

Precision Castparts slams study that deemed it the US' top air polluter

It took nearly two days, but Precision Castparts has come out swinging against a study that deemed it the top air polluter in the United States.

As we reported Tuesday, Precision Castparts topped a list of the Toxic 100 Air Polluters of 2013 compiled by the University of Massachusetts' Political Economy Research Institute.

It ranked well ahead of oil companies including Haliburton, Exxon Mobile, Chevron Corp., Royal Dutch Shell and BP, and its toxic score, determined by the population health risk from air releases and incineration transfers reported to the EPA, was more than double that of the No. 2 company in the ranking, E.I. du Pont de Nemours.

Late Wednesday, Precision Castparts released a statement calling the study "deeply flawed" and accusing its authors of misusing EPA data.

“This study does not reflect the commitment of Precision Castparts to environmental compliance and the safety and well-being of our employees and the communities in which we live and work," said Chief Compliance Officer Emi Donis in a statement. "Nor does the study reflect the EPA’s own cautionary statements about how to use the EPA data that the study is based on."

The study assigned "false high toxicity levels to metal emissions," according to Precision Castparts, which cites the study's findings related to chromium emissions as an example. The study's authors, said the company, assume that all emissions are of the most toxic form, when in reality "nearly all of PCC's chromium emissions are in the form of metal dust with very low toxicity."

Precision Castparts went on to say it is committed to "responsible manufacturing practices" and "environmental stewardship."

We'll check in with the study's authors for a response today. Check back later for an update.

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