Stumptown Startups Blog

Stumptown Startups: Whiskey your way from Time and Oak

Stumptown Startups: Whiskey your way from Time and Oak »Play Video

Tony Peniche did some research and realized whiskey gets its flavor from time  -how long it's aged -and oak - or the quality of barrels it's aged in. That's why he started the aptly-named Time and Oak, which lets people season bottles of whisky their own way.

PORTLAND, Ore. -- This holiday season, local entrepreneur Tony Peniche has a product that can help make your spirits bright.

Or dark.

In fact, the products from his latest startup called Time and Oak let you customize your whiskey spirits any way you like.

"I was in the liquor store, going to buy a bottle of Jack Daniels and I had that moment. I thought, what's the difference between top-shelf whiskey and well whiskey? Then it just hit me," Peniche said.

Peniche did some research and realized whiskey gets its flavor from time - how long it's aged - and oak - or the quality of barrels it's aged in. Hence the name of his latest start-up, Time and Oak.

"If the goal is for the whiskey to filter through the wood, remove toxins, add flavor and add color, then there might be a more efficient way to do it," Peniche said.

So he developed special wooden sticks that he calls elements. What makes them so effective?

"We call it accelerated transformation through capillary action," Time and Oak co-founder David Jackson said.

A Time and Oak employee puts a label on one of their whiskey elements.

It may sound complicated, but it all comes down to tiny tubes in the wood, which you then drop into a bottle of whiskey.

Peniche and his business partner David Jackson developed a way to pull the whiskey through the wood more quickly- a process that normally takes years- now can happen overnight.

"We want to give everyone the chance to add their own personality to their whiskey," Peniche said.

They launched a Kickstarter campaign, and reached their 30-day goal in just 18 hours.

Their biggest challenge now is trying to fill the more than 7,000 orders that have come in over the past three months alone. You can buy the whiskey elements from Time and Oak's website.

Portland startup making 3D-printed prosthetic hands wins Pitchlandia

Portland startup making 3D-printed prosthetic hands wins Pitchlandia »Play Video
Jordan Nickerson (background) is making these prosthetic hands with a 3-D printer.

It’s dubbed Pitchlandia, but it’s more like a local version of Shark Tank than Portlandia. Portlanders pitch their best business ideas and the audience decides who walks away with cash.

Ultimately, we get to see the new startup companies emerging in Portland, and maybe use their products, while the startups get a little extra financial support.

Cancer survivor creates stylish, sun-protective clothing line

Cancer survivor creates stylish, sun-protective clothing line »Play Video
Summer Kramer created her own line of sun-protective clothing after she was diagnosed with skin cancer and discovered few clothing options.

When doctors diagnosed Summer Kramer with skin cancer in 2007, she knew she had to change how she protected herself from the sun.

“For me it was life-changing, I was a 26-year-old who thought I was immune to every type of ailment you could find,” Kramer said. “It’s terrifying.”

Portland's WebCease helps secure digital lives after death

Portland's WebCease helps secure digital lives after death »Play Video
A screen capture from the WebCease home page.

Have you ever thought about what happens to your Facebook account when you die? What about your iTunes and Amazon accounts? Even reward programs, like airline miles, are considered your digital assets that could ultimately be vulnerable to identity theft and leave your family members stressed and confused.

Research shows the average American has $55,000 in digital assets, so Portland startup WebCease is working to help grieving families sort it all out. Founder and CEO Glenn C. Williamson is officially launching the company this week but pursued the idea after his own mom died a couple years ago.

Portland startup hopes to change the face of medical training

Portland startup hopes to change the face of medical training »Play Video
Michelle Oulman (not pictured) and her daughter, Emelia, have agreed to be videotaped and added to the ReelDX video library for future learning.

Portland startup, ReelDx, believes it’s leading to better, faster medical diagnoses in children and potentially saving lives.

Not every startup can say that.

Dear Mommy, is it snack time yet? New email app designed for kids

Dear Mommy, is it snack time yet? New email app designed for kids

PORTLAND, Ore. – You’re never too young to LOL.

That’s what Vin Thomas is banking on, at least.

Thomas is raising funds to start an email app called Cubtab, aimed specifically at children as young as three or four years old.

“Rather than just throw them into the deep waters of the internet, we wanted to find a way to introduce them to email, messaging and the internet in a fun and safe way,” he said.

Tag yourself in the crowd: GigaPan's latest social media tool

Tag yourself in the crowd: GigaPan's latest social media tool »Play Video

I’m in a visual medium and work with photographers daily, so I know there’s something special about a truly candid image.  No one is cheesing it up for the camera; it’s just a real moment captured in time.

I think that’s why I’m having so much fun playing with GigaPan’s re-launched and expanded social media tool, GigaPan Tag.

'Uber' wants to operate in Portland, but barriers stand in their way

'Uber' wants to operate in Portland, but barriers stand in their way
A screenshot from the Uber app shows how users can see which cars are available nearby then use the app to hail a town car. The service is currently available in Seattle and San Francisco but not in Portland.

I was in Seattle earlier this year when a friend and I needed a ride from my hotel to his house. My first thought was to find the front desk and have them call a cab. How quaint.

In Seattle, tech-savvy commuters do things a bit different. My friend pulled out his iPhone and opened the Uber app. He glanced at a map, saw a town car was nearby and requested the car.

Within about three minutes the town car was pulling into the hotel driveway.

Why, I wondered, didn’t we have this service in Portland?

It turns out Uber wants offer their service in the Rose City, but regulations stand in the way. They include a requirement that all town car reservations be made at least 60 minutes in advance. That would effectively quash Uber’s business model.