Lack of info. in search may point to criminal involvement

Lack of info. in search may point to criminal involvement »Play Video
David Hadley, left, and Cliff Madison say the lack of information investigators have released in the search for Kyron Horman points to potential criminal involvement.

PORTLAND, Ore. - Two former detective supervisors said Thursday the lack of information investigators have released in the search for Kyron Horman points to potential criminal involvement.

Cliff Madison is a retired detectives’ division commander with the Portland Police Bureau and David Hadley is a retired supervisor of detectives with the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office. Both have decades of experience in police work which includes missing children’s cases.

While nothing released in the case of Kyron indicates any parental wrongdoing, experts say family is always the place to start.

“Most of what gets categorized as missing children are usually a parental situation where mom or dad has taken the child,” said Hadley. “You know, it’s mom loves them more than dad loves them kind of a situation, and the child winds up in the middle of that, unfortunately.”

“You don’t want to blame anybody within a family but you also know you need to eliminate the potential of involvement,” said Madison. “So you’re going to have to ask some tough questions to eliminate those.”

Hadley said, “It’s normal in a missing person case to go to the last person who saw that missing person. It just makes logical sense that that’s where the investigation is always going to begin, and you work back in progression from that.”

With Kyron’s disappearance, that person was his stepmother Terri Moulton Horman, who investigators initially said took him to the science fair last Friday, took a photo of him, and last saw him at 8:45 a.m. as he walked toward his classroom.

Now, they won’t confirm the details of that timeline and Madison said there is good reason for scaling back.

“If you start looking at the potential for any criminal behavior then you need to also look at the case itself. If an arrest is made somewhere down the road can they take care of the court actions you need to take care of, so then you start closing down the case a little bit,” he said speaking generally about missing children cases.

Both men said that the possibility of a stranger abduction cannot be eliminated. There are reports that someone saw Kyron at school at 9 a.m. but investigators have refused to say who saw him or specifically where he was seen.

One thing the FBI did reconfirm Thursday afternoon was that they do know for a fact that the photo of Kyron at the science fair was taken last Friday morning.