Neighbors numb from thundering choppers call for quiet

Neighbors numb from thundering choppers call for quiet »Play Video
Jeff Linscott bought this property in 2007. Since then he's added a helipad but needs a permit for it.

BORING, Ore. – There's a hassle hovering over a portion of Clackamas County and neighbors are taking action, banding together against a local private airstrip they say has turned into a loud business.

The group rallied Thursday to keep the quiet in their neighborhood.

"None of us planned on moving next to an airport, but it's moving in on us, and that's why we're here to kind of give our side of things. And hopefully the county can sort it all out," said Dean Jones.

Jones and his neighbors are battling Jeff Linscott. He runs JL Aviation from his property – property that had an airstrip when he purchased it back in 2007.

Since then he's added a helipad but needs a permit for it. It’s a permit many neighbors don't want the county to grant.

Julie Herman is against the helicopters, especially the noise they create. Normally, her property is very quiet. But just off to one side of it behind some trees is the helicopter hangar.

For her, the noise from the helicopters is annoying. And she demonstrated the noise throughout her speech during a community meeting by continually pounding her fist on the table to simulate the thunder of a helicopter.

"And image being in your house and you're watching television, and it's coming through like this," she said while pounding on the table. "And I'm going to keep doing this (while talking), because this is kind of the way it goes."

Linscott is the man responsible for the noise Herman says she hears. He defends his business and his compliance with the county regulations.

"I know how to comply," he said during the meeting. "And whatever your decision is, it will be complied with." 

Three people showed up to support Linscott. One man said the noise hasn't been an irritation.

But on Thursday it appeared the nays seemed to outnumber the yeas.

Now it's up to the county to decide if the helicopter thump will continue to break the quiet in the neighborhood.

And county officials say a decision on the permit application probably won't be made for another five or six weeks.