Amanda Knox's ex-boyfriend finds her behavior peculiar

Amanda Knox's ex-boyfriend finds her behavior peculiar
Raffaele Sollecito arrives to attend the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014.
ROME - For the first time, Amanda Knox's ex-boyfriend says in a new interview that he has lingering doubts about Knox's odd behavior in the hours after the 2007 murder of her roommate Meredith Kercher, according to new media reports.

Raffaele Sollecito's latest comments, made in an interview with Italian television this week, come weeks after an Italian court reinstated the convictions against him and Knox for Kercher's killing and sentenced them both to lengthy prison terms.

Both Knox and Sollecito plan to appeal the court's ruling, but the united front they have maintained for more than six years since the November 2007 murder may be crumbling.

"There is nothing against me and nothing very strong against Amanda," Sollecito recently told CNN. "And in my case, I really did nothing wrong, and I don't want to pay for someone else's peculiar behavior."

In his interview with Italian TV, he said Knox had spent the night with him but went back to her place to shower, he said. When she returned, she was "very agitated."

She told him that it looked like someone had broken in and that there was blood in the bathroom, Sollecito said. But rather than call the police, she showered and returned to his place. He finds it odd, he now says.

"Certainly I asked her questions," he said. "Why did you take a shower? Why did she spend so much time there?" He didn't get any real answers from her, he said in the interview.

But Sollecito still says the evidence in the case exonerates them both.

For her part, Knox posted on her Facebook page that her ex-boyfriend's new stance is the result of him being used as a scapegoat. "The only reason he has been dragged into this is because he happens to be my alibi," she wrote.

Since Kercher's death, Knox and Sollecito have gone through a legal maze that led to a conviction that was later overturned, only to be followed by a second conviction. He was sentenced to 25 years in prison, Knox to 28 years.

Knox and Sollecito are preparing to appeal their second conviction in the case to Italy's Supreme Court next year. In the meantime, Sollecito's passport has been seized by authorities, preventing him from leaving Italy.

Another man, drifter and drug dealer Rudy Guede from the Ivory Coast is currently serving 16 years for Kercher's murder. He was tried separately from Knox and Sollecito.