Portland parks series: The top spots to cool off

Portland parks series: The top spots to cool off
A young child runs through jets of water at the Tom McCall Waterfront Park in Portland, Ore., Monday, Aug. 1, 2011. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

PORTLAND, Ore. - It's no big secret that we really haven't had much of a summer this year but there are still a few weeks left to get out and enjoy some of the sunny days we have ahead of us.

In fact the forecast for this weekend is calling for some pretty warm temperatures - warm enough that you might want to find a nice spot to cool off.

Every Friday this summer, we've been putting the spotlight on one of Portland's parks as part of an ongoing series. Now, as we wind out the last few weeks of the season, we're going to change it up a bit with some guides to help you enjoy what's left of summer before fall arrives.

This week, we're listing some of the popular fountains, pools and splash pads you'll find at Portland's parks. Follow the links or scroll down for a quick guide to some of the favorites. 


Bill Naito Legacy Fountain
Downtown Portland
Car Wash Fountain
Downtown Portland
Columbia Splash Park
North Portland
Creston Pool
Southeast Portland
Earl Boyles Splash Park
Southeast Portland
Essex Splash Park
Southeast Portland
Farragut Splash Park
North Portland
Grant Pool
Northeast Portland
Holladay Park Fountain
Lloyd District
Jamison Splash Park
Pearl District
Keller Fountain
Downtown Portland

Lovejoy Fountain
Downtown Portland

McCoy Splash Park
North Portland
Montavilla Pool
Northeast Portland
Peninsula Splash Park
North Portland
Peninsula Pool
North Portland
Pier Pool
North Portland
Raymond Splash Park
Southeast Portland
Rose Petal Fountain
Southeast Portland

Salmon Street Springs
Downtown Portland

Sellwood Pool
Southeast Portland
Teachers Fountain
Pearl District
Wilson Pool
Southwest Portland
Woodlawn Splash Park
Northeast Portland

Wading Pools

While the city's pools and spray parks are open the wading pools are not. They are closed this summer for health and safety reasons. The State of Oregon has some new regulations, specifically that the water in a wading pool must be treated and recirculated and there must be protections in place to make sure no one can get trapped in a drain.

So the city will need to do some retrofitting and of course, that can be costly. Right now there isn't any funding in place to make the changes so it's anyone's guess how long they will be closed.