Poll: Federal gun ownership laws not strict enough

Poll: Federal gun ownership laws not strict enough »Play Video

PORTLAND, Ore. – More than half of Oregonians believe federal gun ownership laws don’t go far enough, according to a new poll.

In a new Survey USA poll, conducted exclusively for KATU News, 52 percent of those polled said federal gun laws are not strict enough. 33 percent said the laws were just right. Nine percent said they were too strict, and six percent said they weren’t sure.

The poll has a margin of error of +/- 4.5 percent.

When asked whether criminal background checks should be required for every person who wants to buy a new gun, 90 percent of people polled said they should be required. Seven percent said “no” and four percent were not sure.

That poll’s margin of error was +/- 2.7 percent.

Portland Mayor Charlie Hales on Monday said he joined a group of hundreds of mayors across the country calling on local and national lawmakers to take steps to end illegal gun violence. Hales said he wants to require criminal background checks for all new gun owners.

One gun control bill officially introduced Monday at the Oregon State Legislature would outlaw the sale of large-capacity magazines. Another bill expected to be formally introduced this session would call for a ban on assault weapons sales. Based on poll results, the latter will be the bigger fight.

51 percent of voters polled said they oppose a law requiring a nationwide ban on semi-automatic weapons, which automatically load the next bullet after a shot is fired. 39 percent said they support a ban. Ten percent were not sure. The margin of error was +/- 4.5 percent.

When asked if they would support a law that limits how much ammunition a gun can hold at once, opponents were outnumbered two to one. 62 percent of respondents said they would support the limit. 31 percent opposed the law, and seven percent were unsure. The margin of error was +/- 4.3 percent.

That support dropped 13 percent when asked if they would support a law limiting how much ammunition can be purchased at once. 49 percent of those polled said they would support such a law, while 44 percent said they would oppose it. Seven percent said they were not sure.

The poll’s margin of error was +/- 4.5 percent.

KATU's Patrick Preston contributed to this story.