11/23/2014

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Politics

This isn't a typo: You paid $129 for that 'wet floor' sign

This isn't a typo: You paid $129 for that 'wet floor' sign

SALEM, Ore. – You might not fall when it rains, but you’re definitely getting soaked.

During a routine trip to the state capitol, KATU notice some posh-looking new signs in the lobby and asked some questions.

The price? $129. Each.

How did that come to be?

Legislative administrator Kevin Hayden said it was a result of a citizen’s suggestion.

“Somebody came in and talked to a member of our facility staff and told them that they really felt that the standard yellow signs that you see everywhere, they cheapened their visit to the capitol,”

And yes, that is exponentially higher than the alternative. A quick check online shows the familiar yellow signs most businesses use start as low as $11.

A Portland business called Worldwide Janitorial Supplies sells a nice version for $14.50 apiece. 

“It’s crazy,” said Worldwide employee A.J. Kirpatrick. “It’s kinda like you hear about the $14,000 hammer to of thing. Just way out of proportion.”

Though the Capitol's signs might look better in theory, Kirpatrick pointed out that most warning signs are brightly colored for a reason.

“That’s why they are that color – to warn people,” he said. “If it blends into the rest of the surroundings, what’s the point? If it just looks like a part of the furniture or part of the walls, it’s not really warning people there’s a problem there.”

The state got a relatively good price on the signs – Amazon lists a similar model for $142.

Hayden said at most, the state would by two more of the signs in the future.

“They weren't a terrible expense,” he said. “We'll keep these two because we do like the way these look in here much better.

"I think that people expect that their building, the people's building, is taken care of appropriately."
 

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